What the Proms taught me about leadership

I was watching the Last Night of the Proms on Saturday, enjoying the essence of this wonderfully British tradition in all its glory. Old and new, sophisticated and playful – all blended wonderfully into a rich representation of modern classical music. And although I expected a beautiful performance, what I didn’t expect was to get a lesson in business management.

promsThe stage was bursting with talented musicians and soloists. However, my eyes were inevitably drawn to the conductor, Marin Alsop. With magnetic, mesmerising strokes through the air, she enticed the most amazingly complex music from the orchestra and its chorus. Her eyes, hands, baton – all were completely focussed on the musicians in front of her as she was watching, listening, feeling her way through the notes.

A friend and I got talking about how this is a fantastic visual of how business leadership works – or at least how it should work. The conductor, much like the manager of a business, does not get involved in the detail of any individual instrument during a concert. Even though she is most likely able to perform one or several instruments very well, she doesn’t do it. She allows each person to be the expert, and concentrates on getting the best out of each performer – despite the fact that they may play their instrument slightly differently to how she herself would play it. As long as she gets the sound she wants from the entire orchestra – together – she is satisfied.

A leader’s job is to ensure that harmony is created through collaboration. A good leader communicates clearly, while also listening intently to their team. And just as in the orchestra everyone is included and gets heard, everyone should be made to feel like an important part of the business team. The conductor doesn’t hide behind anyone, but gives credit where it’s due. She allows her musicians to shine.

But as we all know, a successful performance is the result of months and months of hard work, rehearsals and preparation. Just as a good conductor will recognise when the orchestra is ready for the task ahead and wouldn’t place anyone on stage who doesn’t have the skills required, a good leader knows how to pick a team that will excel in delivering the chosen product or service, under attentive and determined guidance from the front.

Let’s all face the music and help each other become better leaders and collaborators!

(Did you miss the performance? Check it out HERE).

Image credit: BBC 2015

Don’t fear the Marmite

Love and hate - credit to Baro24If you’re anything like me, you have an inner drive to be accepted, listened to and loved, especially by the people who really matter in your life. When it comes to business, the same applies. We want our customers – the people who really matter to our business – to accept us, listen to us and love our brand. But does that sometimes mean that we play a bit safe, become a bit bland – or even boring?

A fellow marketer at a creative agency told me about a recent direct mail campaign he had carried out, targeting prospects within the pharmaceutical industry. The letter itself was laid out in the form of a doctor’s prescription sheet, ordering the “patient” to take a hefty dose of the agency’s services. So far, all is well and good. Clever, but nothing too controversial.

However, for the envelopes, he chose to use a red ink stamp with the official-looking statement “Important medical documents inside”. This, as it turned out, stirred up a few emotions! The phone started ringing. Some were congratulating him on a cool, eye-catching and fun campaign, but others had a few bones to pick. Some felt it was unethical and deceptive – and one person even explained how she had hand-delivered the mailer to her colleague who was at home on sick leave, thinking it was crucial that she received it.

Now, regardless of whether the recipient loved or hated the campaign, it’s likely that they will remember it.

Some may place the agency on their wish list for future creative work; some may blacklist them for the foreseeable future. So – does this mean the campaign was successful or unsuccessful?

Some would argue that this is “natural selection” in the marketing world and that the unhappy targets weren’t a good match for the agency in the first place. Others might say that a campaign that aggravates part of your audience is inherently flawed.

In my personal opinion, I think the campaign was risky – but that was also what made it great! Some of the greatest artists, creators and leaders of our time have been both loved and hated, because they refuse to play it safe. So why can’t businesses do the same? You may face some tough commentary, but you may also gain some superbly dedicated advocates along the way.

Allow your brand to ruffle a few feathers!

(Image credit to BaRo24: baro24.deviantart.com)